Since Non-Target CDs cover many different record labels, a plethora of terms have evolved to describe unique features of various pressings.  Additionally, an “alphabet soup” exists among all the catalog number formats used by the different record labels.  These terms and catalog numbers are sprinkled throughout this web site to highlight special features and to distinguish one issue of an album from another.  As such, I thought it would be beneficial to provide a glossary of these and other important terms pertaining to early CDs.  Where appropriate, I have provided a picture to support the definition.

Additionally, I have included some terms that pertain to CDs in general and are, therefore, not unique to early CD pressings.

This page is under construction.

  • 18P2: The catalog number prefix for a budget series released by WEA in Japan in the late ’80s.  Some titles were first issued in this series, but other titles represent second Japanese issues.  Obi strips for 18P2 titles bear the name “Forever Young Series”.
  • 20P2: The catalog number prefix for a budget series released by WEA in Japan in the late ’80s.  Some titles were first issued in this series, but other titles represent second Japanese issues.  Obi strips for 20P2 titles bear the name “Forever Young Series”.
  • 28DP: The catalog number prefix used for the fourth series of rock, pop, and jazz CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan in the late ’80s.  The “28″  in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥2,800. 
  • 30DP: The catalog number prefix used for the third series of rock, pop, and jazz CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan in the late ’80s.  The “30″  in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,000. 
  • 32DP: The catalog number prefix used for the second series of rock, pop, and jazz CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan.  The “32″  in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,200. 
  • 32PD: The catalog number prefix for the first series of Phonogram titles issued in Japan.  Record labels represented in this series include Mercury, Vertigo, and Rocket.  Many of the earliest 32PD discs were merely original U.S. and/or European issues modified by addition of an obi strip and Japanese lyric sheet.  32PD titles have a distinctive “long” obi strip that covers the entire back of the jewel case.
  • 32XB: The catalog number prefix used for the second series of CDs issued by A&M in Japan.  The “32” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,200. 
  • 32XD: The catalog number prefix used for an early series of MCA and WEA titles issued in Japan.  The “32” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,200.  While 32XP discs represent original U.S. issues modified for release by addition of an obi strip and Japanese lyric sheet, 32XD discs were custom releases for the Japanese market, meaning that the discs and inserts bear the 32XD catalog number.
  • 32XP: The catalog number prefix used for an early series of MCA and WEA titles issued in Japan.  The “32” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,200.  Titles from this series are merely original U.S. issues modified for the Japanese market by addition of an obi strip and Japanese lyric sheet.  Thus, the discs and inserts bear the U.S. catalog numbers.
  • 35DC: The catalog number prefix used for the first series of classical CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan.  The “35” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,500. 
  • 35DP: The catalog number prefix used for the first series of rock, pop, and jazz CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan.  The “35” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,500.  The first title in the 35DP series was Billy Joel 52nd Street, bearing catalog number 35DP 1.
  • 38DC: The catalog number prefix used for an early series of classical CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan.  The titles in this series were digital recordings.  The “38” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,800.
  • 38DP: The catalog number prefix used for an early series of rock, pop, and jazz CDs issued by CBS/Sony in Japan.  The titles in this series were digital recordings.  The “38” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,800.
  • 38XB: The catalog number prefix used for the first series of CDs issued by A&M in Japan.  The “38” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,800.  The first title in the 38XB series was Quincy Jones The Dude, bearing catalog number 38XB-1.
  • Black Triangle: A design used on CDs pressed in Japan for several labels, including Capitol-EMI and Virgin. A CD with the black-triangle design is shown below.
  • Blue Spiral: An early design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Vertigo label. A CD with the blue-spiral design is shown below.
  • CDCBS: The catalog number prefix used by CBS/Sony for CDs issued on the CBS label in Europe and Australia.
  • CDEPC: The catalog number prefix used by CBS/Sony for CDs issued on the Epic label in Europe and Australia.
  • CDGEF: The catalog number prefix used by CBS/Sony for CDs issued on the Geffen label in Europe and Australia.
  • CDPRT: The catalog number prefix used by CBS/Sony for CDs issued on the Portrait label in Europe and Australia.
  • CSR: The acronym for CBS/Sony Records.  The CSR plant in Japan was the first CD pressing plant to open in the world.
  • D18Y: The catalog number prefix for a budget series released by A&M in Japan in the late ’80s.  Some titles were first issued in this series, but other titles represent second or even third Japanese issues.
  • D20Y: The catalog number prefix for a budget series released by A&M in Japan in the late ’80s.  Some titles were first issued in this series, but other titles represent second or even third Japanese issues.
  • D32Y: The catalog number prefix used for the third series of CDs issued by A&M in Japan.  The “32” in this prefix reflected the retail price of these discs, ¥3,200. 
  • DADC: The acronym for Digital Audio Disc Corporation.  The DADC plant in Terre Haute, Indiana was the first CD pressing plant to open in the United States.  It opened in September 1984.  The plant is still owned by Sony.
  • Matrix Code: A grouping of letters and numbers in the mirror band of a CD that can be used to identify a particular pressing plant and the chronology of the pressing.
  • Mirror Band: The reflective metal ring near the center of a disc that contains the matrix code.
  • Non-Target: An early CD pressing that does not bear the Target design. More information on Non-Target CDs is available here.
  • Orange Wave: A design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Vertigo label. A CD with the orange-wave design is shown below.
  • Pink Swirls: An early design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Casablanca label. A CD with the pink-swirls design is shown below.
  • Plastic Ring: The clear plastic section at the middle of a CD.  Some pressing plants embossed unique text on the plastic ring as an identifying mark.  An example is “CSR COMPACT DISC” repeating three times on many Japanese CBS/Sony plant pressings.  Note that early Polygram, PDO, and MPO pressings do not have a clear plastic ring at the center of the disc.
  • Purple Swirls: An early design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Charisma label.  A CD with the purple-swirls design is shown below.
  • SRC: The acronym for Specialty Records Corporation.  The SRC plant presses CDs in the United States for WEA (Warner-Elektra-Atlantic).
  • Target: A design used on early CDs pressed for the WEA labels. Target CDs are distinguished by the design, which resembles a gunsight, crosshairs, or a target. Most Target CDs were pressed in Japan or West Germany.  More information on Target CDs is available here. A Target CD is shown below.
  • Yellow, Black, and Silver Swirls: A design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Casablanca label. A CD with the yellow, black, and silver swirls design is shown below.
  • Yellow and Silver Rays: A design used on CDs pressed in West Germany for the Casablanca and Charisma labels. A CD with the yellow-and-silver-rays design is shown below.