Welcome to my web site! Here you will find information related to early pressings on compact disc. Included is an up-to-date list of my collection of these and other collectable CDs, along with pictures of some of my rare discs. I hope you find this site to be a useful resource!

In the 1980s, R.E.M. came to define alternative rock or what some call “underground music”. Formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980, the quartet of front man Michael Stipe, Bill Berry, Peter Buck, and Mike Mills promoted a new guitar-laden, back-to-basics sound that influenced bands into the next decade and beyond. Starting with 1983’s Murmur, R.E.M. turned out a smash album a year through 1988 (the next album then followed in 1991), and their popularity grew through the decade. Arguably their defining anthem is 1987’s “It’s The End of The World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” from the album Document. You can probably turn back to a time when you were at a party or in a club and everyone stopped and shouted the lyrics. Everyone knows them (and feels fine).

With R.E.M.’s popularity growing in the 1980s, it only made sense for their label, I.R.S. Records, to take every opportunity to promote them, and to do so creatively. At the same time, CDs were becoming the preferred vehicle for music delivery. As we have seen on keithhirsch.com before, CDs became a promotional tool. Why not? What better way to promote an artist? Give people the music! Although promotional CDs seemed like a “Can’t miss”, like many early experimental CDs, many of the early promos were produced in limited quantities. Tying it all together, we consider here a very rare promotional CD single of R.E.M.’s “It’s The End of The World as We Know (and I Feel Fine)”.

The R.E.M. promotional single was released in the U.S. by I.R.S., part of MCA Records, in 1987 under catalog number CD45-17476. Based on the catalog number, I.R.S. obviously saw the CD single as the new 45. In the model of a classic 45, the CD single of “It’s The End of World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” has two tracks, specifically two versions of the title track. Track 1 is an edited version stated on the back insert to run 3:29. Track 2 is the album version, shown to run 4:07.

An interesting feature of this release is the front insert. It is a reproduction of the cover for the December 3, 1987 issue of Rolling Stone. Rolling Stone proclaimed R.E.M. “AMERICA’S BEST ROCK & ROLL BAND” on that cover, so it was a natural choice for the promotional single. This front insert is not a booklet. It is just single-sided and is printed on thick card stock. The song title is printed along the bottom.

The back insert lists the two tracks and is labeled “FOR PROMOTION ONLY” in the lower right corner. Since this is a promotional release, there is no barcode. The back insert is dated 1987, and it states with regards to the featured song “FROM THE I.R.S. LP, DOCUMENT, IRS-42059”. Note that this statement references the LP, not the CD. The original U.S. catalog number for the Document CD is IRSD-42059.

The single was pressed by LaserVideo, one of the first CD pressing plants to open in the U.S. In typical fashion, the disc has “MADE IN U.S.A. BY LASERVIDEO INC.” stamped in the mirror band. The matrix code is “IRSD17476 W.O. # 8765-1”. The disc bears a large I.R.S. Records logo at 6 o’clock. Beneath the logo is the statement “FOR PROMOTION ONLY”.

It is not known how many copies of the “It’s The End of The World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” single were produced, but it was no doubt a limited release. Copies rarely turn up for sale online. Shown below are the front and back inserts along with the promotional disc.

 

REM promo cover_500

The cover for the U.S. promotional CD single of R.E.M. “It’s The End of The World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” (I.R.S. (MCA), catalog number CD45-17476). It is a reproduction of the cover for the December 3, 1987 issue of Rolling Stone. The song title is printed along the bottom.

 

REM back insert_500

The back insert for the U.S. promotional CD single of R.E.M. “It’s The End of The World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” (I.R.S. (MCA), catalog number CD45-17476). The two tracks, an edit and the LP version of the title track, are listed. There is no barcode, and “FOR PROMOTION ONLY” is printed in the bottom right corner. The back insert is dated 1987 in the bottom left corner.

 

REM promo disc_500

The U.S. promotional CD single of R.E.M. “It’s The End of The World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)” (I.R.S. (MCA), catalog number CD45-17476). It was pressed by LaserVideo and has ” “MADE IN U.S.A. BY LASERVIDEO INC.” stamped in the mirror band. The matrix code is “IRSD17476 W.O. # 8765-1”. The disc is labeled “FOR PROMOTION ONLY” at 6 o’clock.

Over the years on keithhirsch.com, we’ve discussed variations among early CD releases. A common variation that gets a lot of attention from collectors are CD label designs. Go back and read posts here on the Phonogram labels to see significant early changes to label designs. Some of those early labels are in great demand due to their rarity and aesthetics. Let’s now consider something different.

In some cases, it is the inserts that are changed early to create a different sort of collectible. Let’s consider the original U.S. issue of Elton John’s famous Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. This double album, originally released in 1973, is chock full of hits, including the ever-popular title track, “Bennie and the Jets”, and “Candle In The Wind”. Goodbye Yellow Brick Road was one of the first Elton John titles released on CD, with MCA Records releasing it in the U.S. as a two-disc set in 1984. MCA assigned the album catalog number MCAD2-6894, with the ‘2’ before the hyphen denoting it as a two-disc set. Let’s take a deeper look at this release.

As a quick aside, you may be aware that the 1995 Polydor remaster of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is a single disc. Everything is there, so why is the original MCA release a two-disc set? Money was likely a factor (a two-disc set was priced higher than a single-disc release). Another factor may have been manufacturing tolerances. It seems that the record labels were reluctant to push capacity limits of CDs in the early days. There are several cases where a double-vinyl set was first released as a two-CD set and subsequently reissued on one CD (without omitting content). Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is one example. So, the album was originally released on two CDs.

The MCA release of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road with catalog number MCAD2-6894 is a two-disc set issued in two separate jewel cases. Thus, each disc has a front and back insert. This set is typically found with plain pink back inserts. The front inserts show the standard album cover, but the back inserts are pink with just the track list in black. Very plain. The spines also are pink with black text. This is not the original U.S. issue. Copies with the pink back inserts are quite common. An earlier version is rather rare.

The first version of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road issued by MCA has album artwork on the back inserts, resembling the original album jacket. The spine labels are yellow instead of pink. Both versions (full-artwork back inserts and plain pink back inserts) bear the same catalog number — MCAD2-6894. Both types of inserts show DIDX-87 and DIDX-88 on the spines. Importantly, the original back inserts are individualized, meaning that the back insert for Disc 1 lists only the tracks on Disc 1, while the back insert for Disc 2 only lists the tracks on Disc 2. By contrast, the reissue has identical pink back inserts for the two discs, as both back inserts list all tracks on the album. Now, what pressings are found with the different insert types?

Seeing as the original issue with full-album artwork and yellow spines is from 1984, it is only found with Japanese pressings. More specifically, there is a Japanese CBS/Sony pressing and a Japanese JVC pressing associated with the original inserts. Of the two, the CBS/Sony pressing is considerably rarer. For the CBS/Sony pressing, Discs 1 and 2 contain “DIDX-87” and “DIDX-88” in the matrix code, respectively. For the JVC pressing, both discs have the MCA catalog number in the matrix code.

The reissue of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road with pink back inserts can be found with a Japanese JVC pressing or later U.S. pressings. Thus, Japanese JVC pressings spanned both insert types.

For the collector, finding either Japanese pressing with the original, full-album artwork is a great accomplishment. Finding the CBS/Sony pressing is expected to be tougher. Shown below is the cover, a spine, and the back inserts associated with the original, full-album artwork MCA release of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. Shown also is a Japanese CBS/Sony pressing and a Japanese JVC pressing.

 

elton goodbye cover_500

The front insert for Disc 1 of the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894).  This is the standard cover artwork for the album. Note “DISC-1” printed in the top left corner. The front insert for the second disc is similarly labeled DISC-2. The later two-disc issue with pink back inserts lacks the DISC-1 and DISC-2 designations on the front inserts.

 

elton goodbye spine_500

A spine label for the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894).  The later and more common two-disc issue has pink spines with black text.

 

elton goodbye disc 1 back insert_500

The back insert for Disc 1 of the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894). There is no barcode. Note the copyright dates of 1973 and 1984 along the bottom. 1973 represents the original release of the album, while 1984 represents the release of this first U.S. version on CD. Only tracks on Disc 1 are listed on this back insert. The common two-disc reissue has a plain pink back insert that lists all album tracks. The pink back insert has a barcode.

 

elton goodbye disc 2 back insert_500

The back insert for Disc 2 of the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894). Only tracks on Disc 2 are listed. There is no barcode. This back insert is also dated 1973 and 1984.

 

elton goodbye disc 1 cbs sony_500

Disc 1 of the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894). This disc was pressed in Japan by CBS/Sony. It has “CSR COMPACT DISC” repeating in the plastic ring, and the matrix code is “DIDX-87 21”. Note “DIDX-87” printed beneath the catalog number at 3 o’clock. Disc 2 pressed by CBS/Sony is similar and has “DIDX-88” in the matrix code. The CBS/Sony pressing of this set is only found with the original full-album artwork and is very rare.

 

elton goodbye disc 2 jvc_500

Disc 2 of the original two-disc U.S. issue of Elton John Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (MCA, catalog number MCAD2-6894). This disc was pressed in Japan by JVC. There is no text stamped on the plastic ring, and the matrix code is “MCAD2 6894 2 M4E11”. This disc does not have the DIDX number printed beneath the catalog number at 3 o’clock (compare to the CBS/Sony pressing above). The catalog number at 3 o’clock is shown as MCAD-2-6894-2, where the 2 at the end represents Disc 2. Disc 1 pressed by JVC is labeled MCAD-2-6894-1 and also has “MCAD2 6894” in the matrix code. Japanese JVC pressings can be found both with the original full-album artwork and the later pink back inserts.

Prince, 1958-2016

2016 has been a difficult year in terms of the significant number of talented musicians who have left us. I will not list them here for fear of omitting someone, though the passing of David Bowie (still hard to believe) was acknowledged here in the form of a short tribute in January. Now sadly, we are dealing with the loss of Prince Rogers Nelson, known the world over of course as Prince. Just 57, Prince was found unresponsive in his Paisley Park home and studio in Chanhassen, Minnesota on April 21st. Shocking. Tragic. A huge loss. It sounds cliche, but it is hard to process.

 

Dearly beloved
We are gathered here today
To get through this thing called life

— “Let’s Go Crazy”, written by Prince

 

I first became aware of Prince as a kid hearing “1999” in 1982. What a sound. It was bold, it was big. The song just sticks in your head. It was funk, rock, and pop at the same time. That was the start, and I became forever a Prince fan in 1984 when Purple Rain was released. Great music, and Prince was so cool. What I did not appreciate then but thankfully learned later was just how talented Prince was. Genius gets thrown around a lot, but I challenge one to argue that Prince wasn’t a genius. From the start, he wrote his music, produced it, and performed it, being a wonderful singer with great range and also an accomplished piano and guitar player. He also danced. He did it all, brilliantly. Prince was also a pioneer of sorts in the way that he fought for ownership and control of his copyrighted music.

 

I never meant to cause you any sorrow
I never meant to cause you any pain
I only wanted to one time to see you laughing
I only wanted to see you
Laughing in the purple rain

— “Purple Rain”, written by Prince

 

R.I.P., Prince.

 

prince purple rain cover_500

 

prince purple rain gold_500

Melissa Manchester established herself as a leading songwriter and female pop/rock vocalist in the 1970s. Her early work included such hits as “Midnight Blue” and “Whenever I Call You “Friend”” (co-written with Kenny Loggins). By the dawn of the CD era, Manchester was still a household name, turning out hits like “You Should Hear How She Talks About You” and “Don’t Cry Out Loud”. Not surprisingly, Manchester’s label, Arista, chose to further capitalize on her success by getting her work out on CD early. Her 1983 compilation, the 10-track Greatest Hits, was one of the first titles released by Arista on CD in the U.S. As such, it bears an early Arista catalog number, ARCD 8004.

Aside from myriad U.S. pressings that hit the shelves over the years, Greatest Hits was released as a Japanese Denon pressing early on. The inserts with this Japanese pressing were printed in the U.S., which is typical for early Arista releases. Although said Denon pressing is a noteworthy collectible from those early days, we highlight here a West German Polygram pressing of Greatest Hits. In my experience, this West German pressing is rarer than the Japanese pressing. A unique feature of this rare pressing is that the accompanying inserts were printed in West Germany, not the U.S. This could mean that the West German Polygram pressing was the first release of Greatest Hits.

As a Polygram pressing, the disc has aluminum running to the center hole rather than a clear plastic ring at the center. The matrix code is “ARCD 8004 2893 367 02”. Shown below are the front and back inserts for the West German Polygram pressing of Greatest Hits, along with the disc.

 

manchester cover_500

The front cover for the West German pressing of Melissa Manchester Greatest Hits (Arista, catalog number ARCD 8004). This is the standard cover artwork for this compilation.

 

manchester back insert_500

The back insert for the West German pressing of Melissa Manchester Greatest Hits (Arista, catalog number ARCD 8004). As noted in the lower left corner, this insert was printed in West Germany. Inserts for early U.S. Arista releases were typically printed in the U.S.

 

manchester wg cd_500

The West German Polygram pressing of Melissa Manchester Greatest Hits (Arista, catalog number ARCD 8004). Instead of a clear plastic ring at the center, this disc shows the typical Polygram plant feature of aluminum running to the center hole. Note that the disc states “Manufactured in West Germany for Arista Records…” at 3 o’clock.  The matrix code is “ARCD 8004 2893 367 02”.

A number of posts here have discussed original CD label designs that were replaced early on by some other designs. In many instances, the original design is viewed as more aesthetic and desirable by collectors. A significant contributor to collector demand is the rarity often associated with the early design. An extreme example is the class of colorful target designs used by WEA that was replaced in the mid-’80s by workaday black text with no paint coating. Target CDs are collectable and sometimes valuable. The later plain pressings, not so much. Here we consider an example of the original design being less aesthetic but still collectable.

EMI started releasing CDs from different genres in 1982, with their releases becoming more widespread in the U.S. and Europe in 1983. The catalog numbers for their early U.S. and European pop, rock, and jazz titles follow the form CDP 7 46XXX 2. The ‘P’ presumably stands for popular. For classical titles, EMI used catalog numbers of the type CDC 7 47XXX 2. In this post, we will discuss these early classical titles.

The earliest EMI classical CDs released in the U.S. and Europe were pressed in Japan. Starting in the mid-’80s, some titles were also pressed in West Germany, Switzerland, the U.K., France, and the U.S. Let’s focus on the Japanese pressings, which were produced by the Toshiba-EMI plant. The earliest Japanese pressings for EMI have a thick black ring along the perimeter, a black EMI logo, black text, and no paint coating. Some of these early pressings show the original Toshiba-EMI “thick” matrix code font. Others show a later “thin” Toshiba-EMI font. These earliest EMI classical titles also have no barcode on the back insert.

By the mid-’80s, EMI changed the label design by adding some color. These later EMI issues, many of which were still pressed in Japan, have a thick red ring along the perimeter, red and black EMI logo, black text, and no paint coating. So EMI transitioned to color, and this label design is very common.

An example of the early all-black EMI label design is brilliant violinist Itzhak Perlman playing Beethoven violin concertos. Perlman is accompanied by the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini. This recording was released under catalog number CDC 7 47002 2. The disc has the black ring and black EMI logo, and it can be found with the early thick or later thin Toshiba-EMI matrix code font. The inserts are identical for the two pressings. The thick-font pressing has matrix code “CC38-3007-6 1A2” and “CDC 7 47002 2”, while the thin-font pressing has matrix code “CC38-3007 11A1” and “CDC 7 47002 2”. Both pressings have two groups of matrix code characters that are separated around the plastic ring by 180 degrees. CC38-3007 is the catalog number for the original Japanese CD release of this title. Many of the early Japan-for-U.S./Europe EMI pressings have the Japanese catalog number in the matrix code.

Shown below is the cover artwork and back insert for the early Japan-for-U.S./Europe Beethoven violin concertos pressings, as well as one of the original Japanese pressings.

 

perlman emi cover_500

The cover for Ludwig van Beethoven (Itzhak Perlman, Violin; Philharmonia Orchestra; Carlo Maria Giulini, Conductor) Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, Op. 61 (Japan, EMI, catalog number CDC 7 47002 2). The catalog number is printed in the top right corner.

 

perlman emi back insert_500

The back insert for Ludwig van Beethoven (Itzhak Perlman, Violin; Philharmonia Orchestra; Carlo Maria Giulini, Conductor) Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, Op. 61 (Japan, EMI, catalog number CDC 7 47002 2). There is no barcode. As noted in the bottom right corner, this insert was printed in Japan.

 

perlman emi disc_500

An early Japanese pressing of Ludwig van Beethoven (Itzhak Perlman, Violin; Philharmonia Orchestra; Carlo Maria Giulini, Conductor) Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, Op. 61 (Japan, EMI, catalog number CDC 7 47002 2). The disc was pressed by Toshiba-EMI. This particular disc shows the second thin Toshiba-EMI matrix code font. The matrix code is “CC38-3007 11A1” and “CDC 7 47002 2”.

David Bowie, 1947-2016

I awoke on January 10th to the shocking news that rock, pop, music-everything legend David Bowie had passed away. Cancer. He was 69. The genius label gets thrown around a lot, but it applies here. He was a mod, then he took the glam movement to the forefront. He rocked, he did pop. He did it all, and he did it with style, grace, and class. He didn’t just follow the trends and fake his way through them until the next one came along. He made the trends, fit them naturally, and caused others to follow him. Of course, through all of this, there was brilliant songwriting and performance. We lost a true cultural giant this past week.

 

This is Major Tom to Ground Control
I’m stepping through the door
And I’m floating in a most peculiar way
And the stars look very different today

— “Space Oddity”, written by David Bowie

 

R.I.P., Starman.

 

bowie cover_500

The cover for David Bowie’s landmark album from 1972, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars.  Specifically, this is the cover for the original CD issued in Japan by RCA under catalog number RPCD-11.

 

bowie back insert_500

The back insert for the original Japanese CD issue of The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (RCA, catalog number RPCD-11).

 

bowie ziggy rpcd-11_500

The original Japanese CD issue of The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (RCA, catalog number RPCD-11).  The 11-track album is filled with hits, including the title track, “Starman”, and “Suffragette City”.

As we get ready to ring in the New Year, we beg the question, “Should old acquaintance be forgot?”. Of course not! We will continue to review old CDs and cover old topics here. So let’s get busy.

Target CDs are a considerable focus of the early CD collector. They are plastered all over this site. An important subsegment that has been discussed here, as recently as July, is the collection of rare U.S. Target pressings. Aside from their rarity, some of these discs are particularly desirable for their unique color combinations compared to their more common West German counterparts. For this post, we will discuss the very rare U.S. Target pressing of Phil Collins’ 1985 smash No Jacket Required. The colors are not unique here, but this is one of the rarest U.S. Target discs in my experience.

There are a few different Target issues of No Jacket Required based on when and where they were issued. For the U.S., No Jacket Required was released on the Atlantic label under catalog number 7 81240-2. The earliest CDs that hit the shelves in the U.S. are the West German Target and a few Japanese Non-Target pressings. All of these discs are rather common.

The West German Target of No Jacket Required was pressed by Polygram and features the typical Atlantic color combination of a red target and green paint coating. The text, including the track list, is printed over the green coating in silver. The U.S. Target has the same label design as the West German version. However, as the U.S. disc was pressed by PDO (Philips-DuPont Optical), it states “MADE IN USA BY PDO” along the lower perimeter in place of the familiar “MADE IN WEST GERMANY BY POLYGRAM”. Of course, all the hits are included on the rare U.S. pressing, including “Sussudio”, “One More Night”, and “Take Me Home”.

The particular CD considered here has “MADE BY PDO” stamped on the play side near the center hole. Adjacent to this text is the matrix code, which is “7567 81240-2 2895 421 02 *”. As is typical for U.S. Target CDs, the inserts for No Jacket Required were printed in the U.S. (The West German Target is often found with West German inserts.)

Shown below are the inserts for the U.S. Target CD of No Jacket Required, along with the disc. Used copies of No Jacket Required are easily found, but the U.S. Target is a true needle in a haystack. Keep looking, as you never know what will turn up.

Happy New Year!

 

collins us target cover_400

The cover for the U.S. Target CD of Phil Collins No Jacket Required (Atlantic, catalog number 7 81240-2). This is the standard cover artwork for the album.

 

collins us target back insert_500

The back insert for the U.S. Target CD of Phil Collins No Jacket Required (Atlantic, catalog number 7 81240-2). A barcode is printed in the top right corner. As noted along the bottom, this insert was printed in the U.S. More common U.S. Non-Target pressings are often found with this same back insert.

 

collins us target_500

The U.S. Target pressing of Phil Collins No Jacket Required (Atlantic, catalog number 7 81240-2). The same red/green combination is found with the more common West German Target pressing bearing the same catalog number. The disc shown above has “MADE IN USA BY PDO” printed along the lower perimeter. It also has “MADE BY PDO” stamped on the play side near the center hole. The matrix code is “7567 81240-2 2895 421 02 *”.

Happy Holidays! As has become a tradition, it’s time to consider an early holiday CD. In 1981, legendary tenor Placido Domingo recorded Christmas with Placido Domingo with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra. The album, containing 10 Christmas classics, was released by CBS Records, and the original CDs released in the U.S. and Europe were assigned catalog number MK 37245. Let’s take a look at the original U.S. CD release.

The U.S. issue of Christmas with Placido Domingo shows the label as CBS, but the MK catalog number prefix represents the CBS Masterworks classical music label. This was an early U.S. CBS release by virtue of the statement, “Disc manufactured in Japan by CBS/Sony, Tokyo, Japan” on the inserts. This means that there is a Japanese CBS/Sony pressing that pre-dates U.S. pressings.

As is typical for U.S. CBS titles, the Japanese CBS/Sony pressing of Christmas with Placido Domingo is very rare. Instead, one will typically find a U.S. pressing of some sort (e.g., DADC or Columbia-Pitman pressings of varying vintage). In this post, we will consider a different, unusual pressing of Christmas with Placido Domingo.

The disc featured here was pressed in Japan by JVC. It arrived on shelves after discs pressed in Japan by CBS/Sony. It is estimated that the JVC pressing is from 1985 or ’86, meaning that it coincided with discs pressed in the U.S. by DADC. As noted in this previous holiday post, CBS farmed out production of some CDs to JVC in Japan beginning in 1985 to keep up with demand in the U.S. These Japanese JVC pressings of U.S. CBS titles are generally rare.

The JVC pressing of Christmas with Placido Domingo has “MADE IN JAPAN” printed along the perimeter. It also bears Digitial Identification Code “DIDC 20039”, where the ‘C’ stands for Classical. Japanese CBS/Sony and early U.S. DADC pressings contain “DIDC 20039” in the matrix code, but this does not appear in the matrix code for the Japanese JVC pressing. Rather, the JVC pressing features the catalog number in the matrix code. Specifically, the matrix code on the JVC pressing is “MK – 37245 – A1E21”.

Shown below are the cover and back insert for the U.S. issue of Christmas with Placido Domingo, along with the Japanese JVC pressing.

I hope you all have an enjoyable and safe holiday. Be well!

 

christmas domingo cover_500

The cover for Christmas with Placido Domingo (CBS, catalog number MK 37245). Note “Noël avec” (French) and “Weihnachten mit” (German) as translations of “Christmas with” along the top.

 

christmas domingo back insert_500

The back insert for Christmas with Placido Domingo (CBS, catalog number MK 37245). There is no barcode, which is unusual for a U.S. CBS release. Note the statement, “Disc manufactured in Japan by CBS/Sony, Tokyo, Japan” along the bottom. This indicates that this title was first pressed in Japan by CBS/Sony. The European Label Code in the lower left corner, LC 0149, suggests that this CD may have been released simultaneously in Europe. There is, however, a distinct European issue that was released under the same catalog number (i.e., unique inserts and CD label design).

 

christmas domingo cd_500

The Japanese JVC pressing of Christmas with Placido Domingo (CBS, catalog number MK 37245). The disc has “MADE IN JAPAN” printed along the perimeter. The Digital Identification Code “DIDC 20039” printed at 3 o’clock appears in the matrix code for Japanese CBS/Sony and early U.S. DADC pressings. However, the matrix code for this JVC pressing is “MK – 37245 – A1E21”.

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